Lupine

Lupine is one of my favorite colors.   So, it should have been no surprise that I had yarn for 2 shawls (from different manufacturers) in my stash, and I then convinced my daughter to not purchase a boring grey for the sweater that I was going to make her.  Did I steer her towards the lovely lupine also? When the kids were little, we had this wonderful book called Miss Rumphius, by Barbara Cooney.  She was also known as the Lupine Lady.  Here is the introduction to this book:

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The Lupine Lady lives in a small house overlooking the sea. In between the rocks around her house grow blue and purple and rose-colored flowers. The Lupine Lady is little and old. But she has not always been that way. I know. She is my great-aunt, and she told me so.

Once upon a time she was a little girl named Alice, who lived in a city by the sea. From the front stoop she could see the wharves and the bristling masts of tall ships. Many years ago her grandfather had come to America on a large sailing ship. Now he worked in the shop at the bottom of the house, making figureheads for the prows of ships, and carving Indians out of wood to put in front of cigar stores. For Alice’s grandfather was an artist. He painted pictures, too, of sailing ships and places across the sea. When he was very busy, Alice helped him put in the skies.

In the evening Alice sat on her grandfather’s knee and listened to his stories of faraway places. When he had finished, Alice would say, “When I grow up, I too will go to faraway places, and when I grow old, I too will live beside the sea.”

 “That is all very well, little Alice,” said her grandfather, “but there is a third thing you must do.”

 “What is that?” asked Alice.

 “You must do something to make the world more beautiful,” said her grandfather

 

You must read the entire book, but she does do something beautiful, and it involves lupines.  This is one of those special books that always stays with me.  And reminds me that I too must leave the world a more beautiful place.
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This is the Irtfa’a shawl that I showed in a earlier post.  I decided to make this to replace my lovely Myrna Stahman shawl that I left on an airplane.  I am finally using this wonderful Mongolian Cashmere that I bought on sale last year (at 60% off!) when the Knitting Workshop was moving locations.  At first I was concerned that it would have too much of a halo for the detailing in this project.  Thanks to Ravelry, I was able to see what other people had both used this yarn for, and had knitted the shawl out of.  I am so pleased with the outcome thus far.  The pattern looks complicated, but is pretty easy once you get it established.  I am still truly amazed at the people who can write lace patterns.  Can’t wait to finish this up.

The other project that I am working on is almost the most boring sweater one could make.  My daughter picked the pattern for #175 Gallery Jacket from Webs.  I am using the Sheffield yarn, which I love.  The sweater is basically a big ribbed scarf with holes for cap sleeves.  I knit it during times when I don’t need to think.  The body shaping is totally taken up by the ribbing (regular ribbing for 2″ at each edge, and a twisted ribbing for the main body).  Not sure why this is so popular, other than it is easy for beginning knitters.

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Both colors match beautifully, are wonderful spring colors to knit with, and the yarns are a joy to feel.