Updates from October, 2014 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • knitting1105 3:09 pm on October 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Two Nancies 

    After a weekend at Vogue Knitting Live, our local yarn shop Knit Nirvana hosted Nancy Bush and Nancy Marchant on Monday evening for show and tell, wine and book signing.  Nancy and Nancy both showed examples from their books in a mini fashion show.  I forgot to take my camera, so consequently these photos are with my cell phone, I took more of people’s feet than anything else!

    Nancy Bush is the Estonian expert; lace, socks and history.  She is a great teacher I have taken classes from her in the past.  Some of these models I have seen prior, but always so worth seeing again.  These are mostly from her book Knitted Lace of Estonia:

    20141027_191735

    20141027_192857

    20141027_192741

    Nancy Marchant is the Brioche lady.  I was not familiar with her, or her books, but as I was leaving, the thought came to me that I had knit a Brioche hat, and sure enough it was a Nancy Marchant pattern from the Vogue Hats book. ultimate-hat-book

     

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Brioche is essentially Fisherman’s rib, but with a pattern attached.  Consequently it is very soft and squishy, warm but light weight, and most importantly reversible.  This was made with 2 very different handspun yarns.  I like the purple side facing the best.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Here is Nancy showing one of her lovely scarves.  Apologies again for the very poor photo.

    20141027_193243

    She has her first book,  Knitting Brioche that was previously published,

    knitting brioche book-2

    and a new hot off the presses one that was at the store.  I gave the copy I had in hand to someone else, always other opportunities.

    61-lDxIJwGL

     

    Nancy M also has a Brioche scarf in the upcoming Holiday issue of Vogue.  Applying Brioche to lace knitting.

    VKH14_merchantD

    A couple of her scarves were with gradients, which got me to thinking….

     
  • knitting1105 8:52 pm on October 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Just for Ria 

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    I was going to title this Baby Ria, as that is what we all called her this summer on vacation.  But, she is no longer a baby, and that is a title that I think that she would like to not have carry over.  So, I finally finished the sweater for Toddler Ria, and sent it off last week.  It arrived, and I received a lovely video of her trying to put it over her head.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    Totem jacket with handspun yarn…

     
  • knitting1105 11:45 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Laundry Day 

     

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    25 Pairs.  Mostly Dan’s.

    I need more clothes pins!

     
    • andresue 7:53 am on October 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      That is a glorious sight!!

      Like

      • knitting1105 7:48 pm on October 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks! Lots of hours there. Luckily, my husband really really appreciates hand knit socks.

        Like

  • knitting1105 8:55 am on October 6, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    For Mom 

    My mother was  great crafter, sewer, quilter and crocheter.  In addition to making all of us beautiful quilts, scrubbies to use in the kitchen, and painting objects, she loved to make crocheted snowflakes for the Christmas tree.  I have many of her  snowflakes, so when I saw this book at the Japanese grocery store the other day, I knew that I had to have it.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Lovely colors and shapes.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    This idea of putting a snowflake on a pair of felted mittens really appeals to me.

     

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Hopefully the class that I took from Donna Druchanus on knitting with Japanese pattern books will help me to decipher these patterns also.

     
    • Manning 1:31 pm on October 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Those are great! And I love that they all seem to actually have 6 sides! Most knitted “snowflakes” have four or eight sides/points, which always drives me nuts because I’m kind of a snowflake nerd and of course snowflakes always have six sides because of the triangular nature of the h20 bonds. https://www.google.com/search?q=knitting+snowflake+pattern&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=nYI1VJO0PIixogSX3IDYBQ&ved=0CB8QsAQ&biw=1338&bih=762

      Like

      • knitting1105 11:39 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        The first snowflakes that my mom made had 8 sides, as she read the pattern wrong. She wanted them all thrown out, luckily I kept some. Thanks for the knitting link. And I don’t know what an h20 bond is exactly, but I appreciate that all of nature makes sense. Check out the book The Power of Limits

        Like

    • Helen 5:21 am on October 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I bought a copy of this also. And I also like that these are ‘anatomically correct’ snowflakes! 🙂

      Like

  • knitting1105 8:34 am on October 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Experimenting 


    After seeing how easy maggie’s dyeing was, and also seeing samples from another friend Kate, I was anxious to try something myself at home.  My collection of marigolds is not quite big enough, but the front yard was bursting with Black-eyed Susans.  Reading about them, it looked as if they would give some good color.  First I set about collecting the flowers and boiling them, letting them set all night, then simmering for 2 hours.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    Next, I did the same with the leaves

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    Before dyeing the skein of yarn, and later 2 sections of  fiber (unfortunately I had not marked the fiber content, so do not know what kind of wool it was), each group was soaked for 20 minutes in an Alum bath.  Then soaked in the dye bath.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    Here are my results from the skein of ear, using the flower tops.  Kind of bland, especially compared to what I dyed earlier in the week.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    This photo is of the 2 sections of roving one dyed with the flowers, and one with the leaves.  Negligible difference in either, and again, kind of bland looking.  I believe that the roving on the right was from the leaves, just a tad bit more yellow in it.  I am thinking that I will spin this test up, and then overdye it later.

     

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    Moral of the story is that it is not as simple as I thought.   I have some books on order from the library.  Also, will be taking a natural dyeing class this month at Vogue Knitting Live.

     
    • Manning 10:26 pm on October 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Do you follow the Finnish user leena on ravelry (http://www.ravelry.com/people/leena). She does a LOT of experiments with natural dyes and I have been following her blog for years. I long for both her garden and one of her mitten kits. (She also has a store here: http://www.riihivilla.com/)

      Like

      • knitting1105 11:36 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Now you have expanded my wish list! She gets beautiful colors.

        Like

  • knitting1105 12:18 pm on October 4, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: natural dyeing   

    Dyeing Part II 

    After last weekend dyeing at the soon-to-be Sugar Beet Coop, Maggie invited a few people over to her house to dye some yarn, and use more of the Indigo.  First I took some lovely angora blend sock yarn, and dyed it in the Indigo. I love this color, the look of blue jeans in the softest of sock yarns.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Unfortunately, the color is rubbing off on my hands, and has diluted a bit.  I need to see if I can overdye it again, and get something to set the color better.

    The other yarn that I took to dye was some nondescript  Merino, imported from China, that was given to me years ago.  I never had much interest in working with it.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     

    That is until now!  Here is one of the skeins dyed in Weld I think, again thanks to Maggie.  Look at that beautiful, rich color.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Next, my own experiments.

     
    • Deb 11:29 pm on October 4, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      At some point I heard someone mention vinegar can help set the indigo when it is rubbing off. It might be worth researching.

      Like

      • knitting1105 1:06 pm on October 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        I tried vinegar, but perhaps my solution was too weak.

        Like

    • Marjo 6:32 am on October 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful colours! I really need to try indigo at some point as well.

      Like

      • knitting1105 1:05 pm on October 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks! My little foray into Indigo dyeing has me wanting more also. Perhaps next summer, as it seems like a good outdoors project.

        Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel