Updates from November, 2017 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • knitting1105 8:54 pm on November 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: meijers, neapolitan ice cream, purple cow   

    Neapolitan 

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    Growing up, ice cream was always a treat.  Wonderful homemade ice cream that my mother cooked on a stovetop with eggs and cream, which then me and my siblings would take turns hand churning on the patio.  After the ice cream was finished and taken inside, we had timed contests to see who could stand the longest barefoot in the icy cold water of the ice cream freezer. That was the best ice cream that I have ever had, ever will.

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    My Paternal Grandfather was a big gentle giant (to the grandkids at least).  Every Sunday, he would drive over in the pickup truck with my diminutive, sweetest woman ever, Grandmother.  We would run out to greet Grandpa, and there were a lot of us, to jump up in his arms, and reach in his shirt pocket for the pack of Juicy Fruit gum that he always came with.  Growing up in a large family, 10 children, on a farm and limited resources, the treats were few and far between.  But, I think that if you ever ask any one of my siblings, we consider our childhood to be full of riches.  And, we had our own baseball team in the side yard!  Every Sunday, Grandpa also brought a gallon of Vanilla ice cream to have after dinner.  Perhaps one of my siblings can remember the brand name of the ice cream, it escapes me now.

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    So, other ice cream flavors were always a treat.  When the large Meijer Thrifty Acres opened in Lansing 20+ miles away, my parents would trek there each week to load up on provisions (this was also where my mother bought my first yarn for projects for me).  Two children at a time were allowed to come along, a younger one and an older one to watch them.  How we waited for our turn to go shopping, as it meant penny horse rides,

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    and most importantly, as our parents were checking out, money to go and get a single scoop of ice cream at the Meijer’s ice cream parlor, the only one many of us went to for years.  The Purple Cow poem hung above the large selection of flavors to choose from, and this poem still frequently pops in my head.  This was a huge treat for us.  I remember loving the gumball flavor as I was attracted to the swirl of colors, but it was always a tough choice.

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    At home, the ice cream luxury, when something other than vanilla was proffered, was Neapolitan.  Putting that ice cream scoop into the box and getting a swirl of flavors was magical (although admittedly, I always tried to maximize my chocolate portions).

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    So, when I saw this yarn, which has been in my stash for a very long time, memories immediately came flooding back.

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    This is a self striping yarn, that was all the rage a few years back.  At one point I even tried to sell it.  I believe that it was purchased at a yarn store closing event, years ago.   In my effort to knit from stash, this was pulled out, and I knew what it needed to become!:

    This is now my favorite cheating treat:

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    • Diane F Hamilton 10:02 pm on November 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Very special and loving memories. I do remember Mom occasionally taking more than 2 kids (maybe it was at Christmas time). I have always said we were much richer than others who had money. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 2:20 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: baby mittens, dog themed mittens, thumbless mittens   

    Tiny Hands 

    Tiny Hands get cold too.  This pattern for thumbless mittens was made a few years ago for baby Ria.  I knew that a certain Colorado Baby-to-be would need these also.

    Pattern: Nordic Baby Mitts
    Pattern Source: Free from Knituition
    Yarn: Dale of Norway Baby Ull, teal blue and mint green
    Needles: US 2
    Date Started: 11/?/17
    Date Finished: 11/20/17
    Finished Dimensions: baby 6-9 months

    Next, I decided to try my hand at designing a pair of mittens, ones that the parents would love.  Had to be dog themed of course.  I had a lot of fun with this, and would love to publish the finished pattern.  For years, I have been on the search for a good knitting pattern template that I could use.  If there are any suggestions out there, it would be much appreciated.

    The first mitten took a bit of trial and error, both in getting checkerboard pattern that worked and minimized dealing with long floats.  I am really happy with how they turned out, these are a bit bigger than the first, and I also opted for inserting a string to tie them on with.

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    After looking at the photos, I feel that they both would do with a nick soaking and drying flat to even out the stitches.  So excited to gift these.

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    • Diane Hamilton 3:29 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What a lucky little girl! These are adorable, I like the pink ones the best. These are perfect stocking stuffers!

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 5:26 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, they are planned as stocking stuffers.

        Like

    • Elaine 4:59 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love these. What a fun way to do baby mitts 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • thecrazysheeplady 10:43 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      How cute!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 3:52 pm on November 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Socks by Bob 

    On Black Friday, I think that it is time to think of others, and not consumerism.  Bob epitomizes that.  Love this story.

     
  • knitting1105 11:46 am on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ,   

    English Tailoring Part II 

    A few years back, I took a class at Vogue Knitting from CocoKnits on English tailoring, and loved it.  We made a baby sweater in that class, which I gave to a friend’s grandson.  I repeated a similar class with her a couple of years later, hoping to hone this process and apply it to more sweaters.  Most recently, I gave Dan yarn for Christmas last year, and have attempted to knit one of CocoKnits top down sweaters for him, I had great difficulty with the gauge, and he has yet to receive that sweater.  I am thinking that this might be a good Holiday project for me…

    So, I posted recently that I was working on this Dale of Norway baby sweater, and wanted to do the set in sleeves as the English tailoring method.  I am proud to say that I have completed this, there was a bit of ripping back and experimenting, but I am quite proud of the end result.

    The only seaming is a few stitches under the arm.  And, the fit is a nice shoulder.

    This sweater has a sweet flower pattern at the bottom.  The pattern called for knitting the fair isle back and forth, but I choose to knit it in the round for those few rows, and steek it.

    I also knit the sleeves in the round.  These few adaptations really made this work as a great English tailoring sweater.

    Hoping to sew the short steek soon and finish this up.

    Julie Weisenberger is a really great teacher and I would highly recommend her classes.  If you are not able to take one of her classes, I highly recommend her new book, which I purchased this past year.

     

    Julie also has several great tutorials on her website that you all should check out, regardless of whether you use the English tailoring method.  I am always on the lookout for new techniques that either minimize finishing or give my knitted objects a more finished professional look.

    Another book that comes to mind is The “I Hate to Finish Sweaters” Guide to Finishing Sweaters.  This is a great book on sweater finishing, i.e. thinking about how you set up your sweater before you start knitting.  Many, many years ago I took a finishing class, and the instructor recommended this book.  It is a short spiral bound book, and one that I refer to over and over again.  I saw it on Amazon for $36!, but found reasonably priced copies here.

     

     
    • Diane Hamilton 12:29 am on November 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      The baby sweater is so pretty, I always admire your talent and skill in knitting. The time you put into these gifts is something that can’t be measured.

      Like

  • knitting1105 10:45 am on November 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    From one Generation to the Next 

    A couple of years ago, long before marriages or grandchildren were on my radar, I packed up a lot of Ethan and Sofia’s sweaters that I had made for them when they were little, and sent them off for nieces and nephews to use.  When Ethan announced that they were expecting, I knew that I needed this sweater back.  In fact, Dan asked about it as it was the one that he wore the most.

    I can still picture him in this, in fact I need to find a photo of him in it.  I love the little hearts all over it.  There was a companion one that is packed away that was made for Sofia in multiple colors (she was 6 and took the sweater and then told me not to knit anything else for her!).

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    This sweater was also knit for Ethan at about the same time, although he did not wear it as extensively.

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    And this was a bit earlier.  My knitting skills have improved greatly since this.

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    And these 3 sweaters date back to Sofia.

    A lovely purple cotton summer sweater

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    A creamy white pullover

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    And this sweater which is nice and warm and cuddly.

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    And, there were a few sweaters that never made the cut to be saved.  I am surprising myself at how prolific I was even with 2 little kids, and watching another to boot.   It is amazing the memories that flood back looking at these sweaters.  Hoping that this new generation cherishes them as much.

     

     
  • knitting1105 4:30 pm on November 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Haunting 

    Abandoned buildings have always intrigued me, especially ones where it looked like someone just walked away one day.  When I was a teenager, my best friend and I would take day long rides on our horses.   The memory of an abandoned house in the woods that we would often go to is still there.  Seeing these photos of this abandoned textile mill from the UK brought back those childhood memories.

    It looks like the door was just closed one day and nobody ever remembered to open it.

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    • Diane F Hamilton 9:12 pm on November 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, and the magic you could have done with all that yarn.

      Like

    • Elaine 6:31 pm on November 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Makes you wonder what happened to make the owners and staff walk out the door one day and never come back.

      Like

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