Updates from December, 2015 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • knitting1105 6:19 pm on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    My Turn 

    The past several months I have been preoccupied with knitting for others, from fingerless mitts for girls weekend, Estonian shawl for Go Red auction, Christmas gifts and goodies for a few special people.  Even though I still have a few projects that are languishing and begging to be finished, I feel like rewarding myself and starting something new, but still using yarn from my stash.  I really had wanted to make this hat, the Baa-ble Hat, by Donna Smith from the cover of this year’s Wool Week magazine, which I purchased when it came out, but for everyone the hat pattern is free via the above link. It was one of the most popularly queued patterns on Ravelry this year, and I think for good reason.

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    Upon closer inspection, that hat calls for an Aran weight Jamieson’s yarn.  I know that the hat will kit up quickly, and I still want to make it, but I resisted the urge to drive out to a yarn store, or to purchase something online.  It will be coming up soon though…

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    In the meantime, I pulled out this stash of Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift

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    and decided that it was the perfect time to cast on for the Sheepheid Tam by Kate Davies.

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    The pattern has been in my procession for a couple of years, and I do have some Shetland wool of several colors that I was intending to handspan just for this, but will be happy to make the hat out of the yarn that I have on hand.

    Next I want to plan a new sweater from some stash yarns, I have a couple of options that I am mulling over.

     
    • natas75 12:34 am on December 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      That’s a lovely pattern. Will definitely check it out, though fair Isle is still something that I’m intimidated by..

      Liked by 1 person

    • Diane Hamilton 2:27 pm on December 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      First I am glad you are making something for yourself, you deserve it! Second, I am thrilled, as I am sure Dan is, that you are able to use some of your stash that you have on hand. It always feels good when you can use what you already have (I try to do this with quilting too but am not always successful). Can’t wait to see the finished project. Happy New Year!

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 2:47 pm on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks Diane, it is not like i am lacking for any of my own hand knit goods though!

        Like

    • Gracey 10:53 am on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, I want to make both of those hats, but I’ve never done any color work besides stripes….its a bit intimidating…

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 2:46 pm on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        the Tam is definitely not the one to start with for a first project. I will let you know how the other one goes. Color work is very fun though!

        Like

  • knitting1105 1:11 pm on September 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: sock dying, sock yarn   

    Dying yarn 

    At the Wisconsin Sheep and Wool Festival on Saturday, Jane and I took a class on dying self-striping sock yarn. Not being a particular fan of self-striping sock yarn, the class title left me less than enthused, but it was open, and something to do for the afternoon.  I was wrong.

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    First off, the class was taught by Nancy from Nancy’s Knit Knacks, the place where Dan got my amazing ball winder for me a couple of Christmases ago. Nancy is a wealth of knowledge, she started out quiet, but really knows her stuff, and explained all of the math that goes into dying self striping yarn.  Her samples were perfect.

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    We set about choosing our colors of dye.

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    And coming up with a plan.  I had to adjust mine, as some of the dyes that I chose were empty.

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    Then painting the appropriate sections of the yarn that was already pre-wound to the correct skein length.

    Edited for clarification:  Nancy pre-wound the skeins.  First you knit 10 rows with your yarn, and figure out how many inches that is in total. You then rewind the yarn to a skein that is that length (it is quite long).  Nancy based her calculations on a 64 stitch sock.  After you figure out what colors you want to use, you need to set up a pattern.  The “Faux Isle” portion needs to be at least 4 rows long if you want to do that.  You can do any combination of row colors to add up to 10 rows.  I chose 2-2-2-4.  Then you measure out the length that you need for each color section and dye that individually.  That section is then placed in its own plastic ziplock back, and saran wrap tied around the end of it (this was the hardest part!).  Continue dying each section and placing in their own plastic bags.  They then get put on a tray with a little bit of water at the bottom for steam and microwaved for 8 minutes.

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    After they cooked in the microwave, we hung them in the doorway to dry

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    Then we spread all of them out and talked about our skeins and what we were trying to achieve.

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    Here is my skein drying

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    And wound up, waiting to be spun into socks for me.  I am not sure that the “Faux Isle” section of the pattern will show up that much, but I like the colors.  Hopefully it will stripe properly.

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    • Selena Rea 4:05 pm on September 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      This is such an interesting post. Thanks for sharing!

      Like

    • andresue 7:59 pm on September 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve been itching to try my hand at dying yarn. I wish a class like that was offered near me. I hope you post pics of the socks that your yarn will eventually become. 🙂 So neat!

      Like

      • knitting1105 1:18 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        I will post pictures when I make the socks. Need to finish the ones on the needle first. After reading your comment, I realized that I could elaborate more on the process, so have added some notes to the post. Thanks for reading.

        Like

        • andresue 2:04 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink

          Thanks for adding the notes. Such a cool class. I can’t wait to see the socks!

          Like

  • knitting1105 1:23 pm on August 28, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Feeling Crafty 

    I have been on a binge with new crafting ideas (inspired by my sewing /knitting room which is coming along nicely). My latest trials were making soap with felted wool around it. Easy peazy.

    First find a nice bar of soap, I used some handcrafted ones, and some colorful roving. Note it cannot be Superwash, and must be wool to felt properly.

    Next wrap the soap tightly with some of the roving in one direction, not too thick, not too thin but making sure to overlap the edges.

     

     

    Using as many or few colors as you would like, wrap the other way around (i.e. turn the bar 90 degrees and wrap).

    The first time I tried instructions which stated to hold the roving firmly, have hot and cold water drizzling, add a bit of hot water and some soap. Rub vigorously with the finger on your other non-holding hand, and it will start to felt. Alternate between hot and cold water sparingly and rotate around the bar. Squeeze out the excess water and set to dry.

     

    Then I tried an alternate method. Wrap in the same manner, but put the roving wrapped soap bar inside a nylon, and I used my Grandmother's washboard. This is an all wooden one from WWII that she had, note the V for Victory, not using any metal. My dad was flying over Germany when she washed her clothes on this. I can only imagine the fear and anxiety with which she scrubbed her clothes. It is worn and well used.

    Just scrub vigorously under a bit of hot water with soap for agitation, rotating the bar around. Squeeze out the excess and set out to dry.

    These are my first few trials, Sofia is being my product tester.

     

     

     
    • Joan 6:53 pm on September 9, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I hadn’t seen the washboard version before. I love felted soaps!

      Like

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