Recent Updates Page 2 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • knitting1105 10:43 pm on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply  

    Repairs 

    I hate repairing knitted items, but there comes a time when the pile becomes so big, and I look at all of that effort sitting unloved, and I delve into it.  A bit at a time.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    This is one of the items that I repaired, one of my sheep hats had holes in the bottom band, it was too much to simply darn, so I opted to rip it back and knit the bottom with a color that closely matched the dark sheep.  I think that my repair came out well, and I have had this hat for the cold weather.

    IMG_2627IMG_2626

    This hat was made with handspan, it is a Brioche.  I loved it, so it also had the band cut off and a new one knit up.  Luckily I still had some of the yarn.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Unfortunately, there are some issues at the top now, perhaps a function of my handspan not being stable enough.  I am putting the rest of this away to think about how to fix it.

    And lastly, I had a couple of holes in this beautiful shawl, Volt, by Grace Anna Farrow. Fortunately this was a simple darning, as it is one of my favorite shawls.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    There is more to repair, I am trying ot tackle them one at a time.  I think that if I do 1 =or 2 a week I will slowly chip away at the pile.

     
    • M-R 2:05 pm on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Gobsmacking stuff ! – I’m full of admiration. 🙂

      Like

      • knitting1105 1:38 pm on March 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you!!! You are so sweet.

        Like

  • knitting1105 11:43 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Baby knitting, baby raglan sleeve sweaters, Brunswick Babies 696, classic baby patterns   

    Best Baby knitting book 

    Recently I was asked by my friend Michelle where the pattern came from for this sweater that I knit for Izumi.

    unnamed

    She also received the bonnet to go with the sweater:

     

    I have knit almost every pattern out of this baby book.  It is the one that I go back to time and again, as I love the raglan sleeves for little ones.  The front cover shows a carriage blanket that I knit for Ethan when he was a baby, and gave to them for Izumi.  That one was a beautiful coral color, with a sparkly sheen, unfortunately, I do not have a photo of it.

    Blog Photos743

    In fact, this was not the only sweater from this book that I knit for Izumi before the was born, I also gave her this one at the baby shower, along with the matching hat:

     

    You can see that the book is a bit worse for wear, so I decided that it was time to order a replacement.  It was pretty easy to find on Amazon, and not at all expensive.

    Blog Photos744

    One would think that I could then give away the scrappy copy, but I opted to keep both.

    Blog Photos745

    You might be wondering why.  I want to keep knitting these patterns, and my original book was not going to last long.  However, sentimentality kept me from giving away the first.

    This book was published in 1973, I was the big knitter in the house at the time.  Even though my mother had taught me to knit, she was not knitting at that time.  In fact, she never took up knitting again, but delved into crocheting lace doilies, and extensive quilting.  So, when I saw her name at the front of the book, I was not sure why, since this was most likely purchased (at Meijer Thrifty Acres, next to the Red Heart yarn) for me to knit gifts for family and friends.

    Blog Photos749

    I know that i knit this green sweater for a neighbor’s new baby:

    Blog Photos751

    And here are my favorites, I love the raglan sleeves and how they fit so well on babies.

    Blog Photos750

    This coat is on my “bucket list” to make for Izumi.  I never had time to knit something like this when Sofia was little.  I think that this would be a cute coat to have.

    Blog Photos752

    If you are interested in this book, it is available on Amazon here.  And, it is only slightly more expensive than the $1.50 we paid IN 1973!

     

     
    • Yvonne Creanga 12:20 pm on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      What a great post! It is so much fun to read about the family history and in the same time see what inspires you. I do remember my own mother knitting and I have great vivid memories of her fitting me with a great skirt with crochet applications of multi color flowers. I wish I had a picture of it, you’d love it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • polwygle 6:02 pm on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Such a neat book of patterns. Thank you for the recommendation… These look neutral and classic. I have a bit of planning to do. My next little one will be here before I know it!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Diane 8:04 pm on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Frances, I can’t wait to see the coat in person. I know it will be beautiful because everything else you have made is beautiful. I had a cookbook that Mom and Dad gave me for Christmas the first year I moved out of the house. It was well used and falling apart and I wouldn’t get rid of it because they (mom) had inscribed something on the front page. We had the exact cookbook at the beach house so I brought it to Colorado and tore out the page from my ratty cookbook and inserted it in the front of the good one. I understand not wanting to get rid of the old book. I don’t think our children will be as sentimental.

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 11:58 am on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply  

    My Favorite Model 

    Izumi has been sporting some of the sweaters that I knit for her.  Recently she was spied wearing this lovely green variegated sweater out on the town.  There is definately room for growth in this.

    unnamed

    I couldn’t ask for a better model.  These rabbit booties were given to Sofia by my mother when she was a baby.  They were my favorite booties for the kids, kick as they might, they never were able to kick them off.  I should try to reverse engineer these.

    unnamed-1

    And just in case you need a bit more of this cuteness, here goes.  My husband gets to go visit her next week, and me next month.

     
    • salpal1 12:12 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      She’s a beauty! Definitely worth knitting for!

      Liked by 1 person

    • polwygle 12:58 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      So precious and beautiful… 🙂

      Like

    • Jennifer 2:05 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      She is beautiful!

      Like

    • Elaine 5:18 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Oh my goodness but she is absolutely gorgeous x

      Liked by 1 person

    • Barbara Mayer 8:29 am on February 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      HI Frances,

      Your granddaughter is ADORABLE! As are your knitted items on her!

      I hope you do reverse engineer those rabbit booties!

      Have a great day, Barb

      >

      Liked by 1 person

    • Diane 11:18 pm on February 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Izumi is adorable and now you have plenty of opportunity to have her model may more of your beautiful pieces of art. She had the rabbit booties on the other day, I didn’t know the story behind them. Sayaka is very good about dressing her in your gifts. I agree the sweater will last for several more months.

      Liked by 1 person

    • M-R 2:08 pm on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I suppose she is in Japan ? – what guesswork, eh ? 😉
      She is indeed cute; and your contributions to her wardrobe must be met with great joy !

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 1:38 pm on March 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Nope! she lives in Denver, and I get ot go soon and stay for a week! Looking forward to it, and I will be posting photos. Thanks!

        Like

      • knitting1105 11:26 am on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Not Japan, Denver. Closer definitely, but we still only see her a few times a year.

        Like

  • knitting1105 10:04 am on January 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply  

    Idle Moments 

    Knitting keeps me sane, whether at a meeting, standing in a line, or riding in a car.  I listen better when I knit, and for those times I normally choose very simple patterns that do not require a lot of thought or planning.

    While on vacation, my son-in-law was surprised that on a relatively short drive to my son’s house (10-15 minutes), that I pulled out my knitting and started away.  I explained that much knitting was accomplished in those few, otherwise idle moments, when you add them all up together.  That got me to wondering how many socks, mittens, and dishcloths I had knit by capturing time whenever I can.  I will never know, but I do know that these items were knit catching snippets of time, Idle Moments.IMG_2624IMG_2625

    I think that most knitters do this, that is what makes this craft more advantageous than others, the portability.

     
    • salpal1 6:12 pm on January 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I agree! I listen better when knitting, and a row here and there really adds up!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Connie 3:30 am on January 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, when I was at school we defended our “knitting in class” by claiming that we can listen better when knitting and our teachers surrendered (it was the anti-authoritarian time …)

      Now, today, as a trained teacher I doubt that you can concentrate better when knitting IN ALL SITUATIONS. Watching TV – series or sitting in a train, it’s clear because there is no intellectual challenge around you which asks for attention

      When there is a lecture with compex content I would not want to have any knitters in the audience, I also would ask to switch off mobiles etc.

      “I think that most knitters do this,” … you are not absolutely right. To knit dishclothes is not a habit everywhere, I don’t know any knitter (or at least knitter around me) who uses knitted dishclothes or who knits them. Here in Europe, most knitters which I know are wondering about knitted dishclothes, most see them as “unhygienic”

      Cheers, Connie

      Like

      • knitting1105 12:03 pm on January 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Connie, thanks for your long comment and for reading my blog.

        First, when I said “I think that most knitters do this…” I was referring to having small knitting projects at hand to make use of those idle moments. I have knit many items during this time, including those dishcloths. I never made dishcloths until a few years ago, and have gifted most of them. People seem to like them and ask for more, some use them as washcloths. Interesting that this is a US thing. Socks are another favorite of mine to always have at hand for those short moments.

        I also teach, at the local Community College, and while I have cell phones turned off, I knit during meetings and some classes that I am taking or observing. It is at those times that I knit the easy, no need to think about projects, most of which I can knit without looking. Knitting does help me to focus and listen to a lecture or discussion at a meeting. I know a lot of other knitters and crocheters who say the same, but not everyone. I dread the thought of being on a jury without my knitting!

        Home time is for those complicated projects.

        Happy Knitting!

        Frances

        Like

    • evilandrea 9:35 am on January 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      It’s really interesting to hear other people find they listen better when they knit. I have recently started taking knitting to work because when I have to listen to recordings for quality or dispute I find I can do it better and am more focused with a needle in each hand.

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 10:19 pm on January 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply  

    Izumi 

    On December 19th, my beautiful Granddaughter, Izumi was born.  We were fortunate to arrive the next day and to stay near her for 2 weeks.  Ours will be a long distance relationship, coupled with sharing photos and videos, Skype and visits as often as feasible.

    Last Fall I had made 3 sweaters for her to give at the baby shower.  One of them was this Elizabeth Zimmerman Baby Surprise sweater.  This was knit with my handspun yarn from a few years ago.  I love how the thick and thin yarn worked out on this.  And the square buttons were the perfect touch.

    So, on New Years day, my daughter-in-law and son brought Izumi to visit at our Air BnB, and she was sporting this sweater.  I think that the colors look beautiful on her.

    IMG_2603

    It has plenty of room to grow into, but worked perfectly on a 2 week old.  It makes me happy to see her in it.

    IMG_2602

    I know that every parent/grandparent thinks that their baby is beautiful, but she is just gorgeous, and has been since birth.

    img_2606.jpg

    And here is the proud Papa.

    IMG_2601

     
    • Pam 10:30 pm on January 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations.I know you will enjoy every precious moment as a grandparent.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Diane F Hamilton 10:46 pm on January 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations! The sweater is almost as beautiful as your granddaughter.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Joan D Winstein 11:19 pm on January 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love the look on Ethan’s face. He’s clearly already a wonderful Dad !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elaine 3:16 am on January 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations. What a beautiful baby girl. Have to say, judging by the gorgeous little pout she’s showing in the last photo, proud papa is going to be hard pressed to stand firm against her pleading as she gets older. I’m predicting he’ll be wrapped around her tiny, little finger before long ……. if he isn’t already that is 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 1:12 pm on January 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        He is definitely smitten, and very protective.

        Like

    • nothingbutknit2 7:11 am on January 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations!! She is just lovely:) The sweater you knit is beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

    • salpal1 9:26 am on January 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations! She is beautiful and her sweater suits her. She is lucky to start life in handspun handknit garments!

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 3:28 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Fair isle cutting, steeking   

    Butterflies 

    Seeking never ceases to make me nervous, I always have a glass of wine to get my courage up to sew and cut something that I have put so much time and effort in to.  No matter how many times I do it, I still need to muster up the courage.  To date, everything has been just fine, and I have not ruined anything.

    This sweater and set is being made for my granddaughter to be.  I love the butterflies, and they hold special meaning to my family.  My sister Anita, and my mother both loved butterflies.  Whenever I see butterflies in the spring, it always brings both of them to mind.  I knew when I saw this pattern that I had to make it.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    The colors are so lovely and fun to work with.  Makes any grey day brighter.  And the steeking, after a nice glass of red wine, proved not to be so bad.  Just have to make sure to pull the strings to the opposite side when sewing.

    Blog Photos737

    And once this is done, the cutting is actually fun, and you open up the tube, now it starts to look more like a sweater to be.

    Blog Photos741

    This is progressing nicely, now for the details and edging.  I still have to set in the sleeves, which is not my favorite part I must say.  It involves 2 more steaks, and another glass of wine.

     
    • Yvonne Creanga 10:10 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Can’t wait he the next step and details you’ll show us about his project.
      You light years ahead of all that I would attempt to make but it sure is nice to see your adventures in knitting.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yvonne Creanga 10:16 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry for my incoherent English. I am typing on my phone and I don’t know how to get back in the text above and correct it.
      “Can’t wait to see” and “you are light years”
      Better now

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elaine 3:32 pm on December 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Oh how lovely! Your grand-daughter to be is a very lucky little baby. That is by far the prettiest knitted baby garment I’ve ever seen 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • jill 11:36 pm on December 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This is so darling! I can imagine how you feel cutting your work. Remember how I cut that sweater that took me months/years to make???? I was so traumatized that I never returned to fully sew it up. Still hoping you’ll finish it for me next time you visit.

      Liked by 1 person

    • evilandrea 3:51 am on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That colour work is lovely. And steeking is the one knitting technique I’ve yet to be brave enough to try

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 1:15 pm on January 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I really recommend taking a class for the first time, accompanied by a glass of wine, and a big breath. I still have a glass of wine ot calm my nerves. I think that the sleeve cutting makes me more nervous than the front steek.

        Like

    • knitterjules 12:07 am on January 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love your butterflies! Great choice of colours- perfect for knitting on during all the grey winter weather!

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 10:58 am on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        thank you! It is the perfect colors for the short winter days. I have been sidetracked, and need ot get back to it.

        Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 8:54 pm on November 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: meijers, neapolitan ice cream, purple cow   

    Neapolitan 

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Growing up, ice cream was always a treat.  Wonderful homemade ice cream that my mother cooked on a stovetop with eggs and cream, which then me and my siblings would take turns hand churning on the patio.  After the ice cream was finished and taken inside, we had timed contests to see who could stand the longest barefoot in the icy cold water of the ice cream freezer. That was the best ice cream that I have ever had, ever will.

    ice-cream-handcrank

    My Paternal Grandfather was a big gentle giant (to the grandkids at least).  Every Sunday, he would drive over in the pickup truck with my diminutive, sweetest woman ever, Grandmother.  We would run out to greet Grandpa, and there were a lot of us, to jump up in his arms, and reach in his shirt pocket for the pack of Juicy Fruit gum that he always came with.  Growing up in a large family, 10 children, on a farm and limited resources, the treats were few and far between.  But, I think that if you ever ask any one of my siblings, we consider our childhood to be full of riches.  And, we had our own baseball team in the side yard!  Every Sunday, Grandpa also brought a gallon of Vanilla ice cream to have after dinner.  Perhaps one of my siblings can remember the brand name of the ice cream, it escapes me now.

    ice cream

    So, other ice cream flavors were always a treat.  When the large Meijer Thrifty Acres opened in Lansing 20+ miles away, my parents would trek there each week to load up on provisions (this was also where my mother bought my first yarn for projects for me).  Two children at a time were allowed to come along, a younger one and an older one to watch them.  How we waited for our turn to go shopping, as it meant penny horse rides,

    img_8656

    and most importantly, as our parents were checking out, money to go and get a single scoop of ice cream at the Meijer’s ice cream parlor, the only one many of us went to for years.  The Purple Cow poem hung above the large selection of flavors to choose from, and this poem still frequently pops in my head.  This was a huge treat for us.  I remember loving the gumball flavor as I was attracted to the swirl of colors, but it was always a tough choice.

    purplecowjpgpng-c8718262c9126e75

    At home, the ice cream luxury, when something other than vanilla was proffered, was Neapolitan.  Putting that ice cream scoop into the box and getting a swirl of flavors was magical (although admittedly, I always tried to maximize my chocolate portions).

    937c2032-0ad7-41fe-9569-ab3b3db81a00_1.0255037ff541ca57b00adc69f2f729d3

    So, when I saw this yarn, which has been in my stash for a very long time, memories immediately came flooding back.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    This is a self striping yarn, that was all the rage a few years back.  At one point I even tried to sell it.  I believe that it was purchased at a yarn store closing event, years ago.   In my effort to knit from stash, this was pulled out, and I knew what it needed to become!:

    This is now my favorite cheating treat:

    IMG_1361.jpg

     
    • Diane F Hamilton 10:02 pm on November 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Very special and loving memories. I do remember Mom occasionally taking more than 2 kids (maybe it was at Christmas time). I have always said we were much richer than others who had money. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 2:20 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: baby mittens, dog themed mittens, thumbless mittens   

    Tiny Hands 

    Tiny Hands get cold too.  This pattern for thumbless mittens was made a few years ago for baby Ria.  I knew that a certain Colorado Baby-to-be would need these also.

    Pattern: Nordic Baby Mitts
    Pattern Source: Free from Knituition
    Yarn: Dale of Norway Baby Ull, teal blue and mint green
    Needles: US 2
    Date Started: 11/?/17
    Date Finished: 11/20/17
    Finished Dimensions: baby 6-9 months

    Next, I decided to try my hand at designing a pair of mittens, ones that the parents would love.  Had to be dog themed of course.  I had a lot of fun with this, and would love to publish the finished pattern.  For years, I have been on the search for a good knitting pattern template that I could use.  If there are any suggestions out there, it would be much appreciated.

    The first mitten took a bit of trial and error, both in getting checkerboard pattern that worked and minimized dealing with long floats.  I am really happy with how they turned out, these are a bit bigger than the first, and I also opted for inserting a string to tie them on with.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    After looking at the photos, I feel that they both would do with a nick soaking and drying flat to even out the stitches.  So excited to gift these.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

     
    • Diane Hamilton 3:29 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What a lucky little girl! These are adorable, I like the pink ones the best. These are perfect stocking stuffers!

      Liked by 1 person

      • knitting1105 5:26 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, they are planned as stocking stuffers.

        Like

    • Elaine 4:59 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love these. What a fun way to do baby mitts 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • thecrazysheeplady 10:43 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      How cute!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  • knitting1105 3:52 pm on November 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Socks by Bob 

    On Black Friday, I think that it is time to think of others, and not consumerism.  Bob epitomizes that.  Love this story.

     
  • knitting1105 11:46 am on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ,   

    English Tailoring Part II 

    A few years back, I took a class at Vogue Knitting from CocoKnits on English tailoring, and loved it.  We made a baby sweater in that class, which I gave to a friend’s grandson.  I repeated a similar class with her a couple of years later, hoping to hone this process and apply it to more sweaters.  Most recently, I gave Dan yarn for Christmas last year, and have attempted to knit one of CocoKnits top down sweaters for him, I had great difficulty with the gauge, and he has yet to receive that sweater.  I am thinking that this might be a good Holiday project for me…

    So, I posted recently that I was working on this Dale of Norway baby sweater, and wanted to do the set in sleeves as the English tailoring method.  I am proud to say that I have completed this, there was a bit of ripping back and experimenting, but I am quite proud of the end result.

    The only seaming is a few stitches under the arm.  And, the fit is a nice shoulder.

    This sweater has a sweet flower pattern at the bottom.  The pattern called for knitting the fair isle back and forth, but I choose to knit it in the round for those few rows, and steek it.

    I also knit the sleeves in the round.  These few adaptations really made this work as a great English tailoring sweater.

    Hoping to sew the short steek soon and finish this up.

    Julie Weisenberger is a really great teacher and I would highly recommend her classes.  If you are not able to take one of her classes, I highly recommend her new book, which I purchased this past year.

     

    Julie also has several great tutorials on her website that you all should check out, regardless of whether you use the English tailoring method.  I am always on the lookout for new techniques that either minimize finishing or give my knitted objects a more finished professional look.

    Another book that comes to mind is The “I Hate to Finish Sweaters” Guide to Finishing Sweaters.  This is a great book on sweater finishing, i.e. thinking about how you set up your sweater before you start knitting.  Many, many years ago I took a finishing class, and the instructor recommended this book.  It is a short spiral bound book, and one that I refer to over and over again.  I saw it on Amazon for $36!, but found reasonably priced copies here.

     

     
    • Diane Hamilton 12:29 am on November 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      The baby sweater is so pretty, I always admire your talent and skill in knitting. The time you put into these gifts is something that can’t be measured.

      Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel