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  • knitting1105 2:53 pm on January 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Casting on (knitting), French Cast on, tubular cast on   

    French Cast-on 

    A woman visiting our SnB group last week mentioned trying to do a French Cast-on.  I must admit that she had me perplexed until we talked a bit, and it was just a fancy way of saying tubular cast-on, although I do prefer the name French Cast-on, and may have to use it from now on.  This got me to googling it when I got home.  Nothing new, except that I found this video by Eunny Jang:

    Ignore the fact that her producers did not have her use 2 highly contrasting yarns so that it would be evident as to what she was doing.   Normally I make a tubular cast on starting with a crochet chain where I pick up the requisite number of stitches needed in each of the bumps on the chain.  I have shown that in the past in this post.

    • What intrigued me about Eunny’s technique was that I could actually cast on 1/2 + 1 the final number of stitches needed in a contrasting color and just knit, (use a needle 1-2 sizes larger than you will end up knitting with.  Here I used a size 3 don). I wanted to end up with 48 sts for my mittens, so I cast on up 25 + 1 = 25sts.  I am only using 4 needles here, the stitches on 3, as there are so few to work with. Join in a circle (with the forever mentioned note:  be careful not to twist your stitches), and knit 3-4 rows.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
    • knit for couple of rows, then start with your garment color and knit 3-4 rows still using the larger needles.

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    • Using the needle size that you will be knitting the socks with:  *Knit the first stitch.  For the second stitch, reach over the top of the knitting into the cast-on edge, and pick up the first “purl bump” of your sock yarn (not the contrasting color yarn that you cast on with), this is where using a clearly contrasting color such as I did really helps.  Put it onto the left hand needle and purl that stitch.**
    • Repeat from * to **, ending with a K1.  You will now have your desired number of stitches plus one extra on your finished needle size, the first and last stitches will be knit stitches.
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    • Do 2-3 rows of 1×1 ribbing. On the first row knit the first and last stitch together. The stitch count will now match your pattern requirements.  I am doing a twisted 1×1 rib here, using 5 size #1 dpn’s.
    • After you have knit at least 3-4 rows, or anytime in the pattern progress that you feel like, it will be time to pull out the contrasting cast on yarn.

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    • You can clearly see here how the coast on yarn (purple) is now pulled underneath the fabric.

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    • It always helps to have a pair of Eiffel Tower scissors to trim with.

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    • Just cut a row or 2 into the cast on contrast yarn.  Cut off the bottom cast on row(s).

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    • Pull out all of the cast on yarn

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    • And Voila! you have a beautiful finished edge that looks like the knitting just rolls over on itself.
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    • It is very stretchy, almost feels like the edge has elastic in it.
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    The key to making this work is to do the set up rows where you have 1/2 the number of stitches, in a larger size needle.  Otherwise it will be very hard to pick up and not have the stretch that you are looking for.

    Merci Beaucoup!

     
    • Helen 6:51 am on January 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, I hadn’t thought to check out the tubular cast on and now I have to try this on the next pair of socks or mitts!

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    • V o n n a 4:36 am on January 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Seems awesome. Results I’d like to have, but honestly could not wrap my head around this. Perhaps 4:30 AM and NOT watching the video was to my disadvantage. I’ll comeback when brain cells want to learn a new knitting technique. 😉

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      • knitting1105 3:50 pm on January 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Please come back soon! Watch the video, then try a sample with very different colors so that you can clearly see the bumps. I think it will make sense when you are awake and can focus. Just do a practice swatch first. Let me know how it comes out.

        Liked by 1 person

        • V o n n a 4:26 pm on January 14, 2015 Permalink

          Sure. Sounds like a plan. Question: can you use this cast on for any hat knit in the round?

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        • knitting1105 7:57 pm on January 14, 2015 Permalink

          You can cast on using this method for anything that has ribbing. 2×2 ribbing is a bit more fiddly, I will talk about that at a later date. I have used it on knitting that is not in a round. See this post where the bottom was knit back and forth prior to joining in a round. Or this one where I describe it in more detail, although using the crochet chain for the cast on.

          Liked by 1 person

        • V o n n a 8:16 pm on January 14, 2015 Permalink

          Thanks I’ll go through everything and reread your post about the cast-on including watching the video before I cast on my hat to see if I’d like to try it on barley.

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  • knitting1105 2:59 pm on May 29, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Casting on (knitting), , ,   

    Tubular Cast-on for Socks 

    I love the tubular cast-on.  It makes a garment look really finished and professional.  Years ago, when I saw a sweater knit with the tubular cast-on, I asked the owner how to do it.  She was teaching at the LYS, and I had taken many classes from her.  Her response was that I needed to just take that class.  I taught myself instead.  Well, I don’t teach knitting, and feel that the more we share the better.  So, here is my version of a tubular cast-on for socks.  This works for a 1×1 rib.  If you wanted to convert to a 2×2 rib, that is possible, I have done it on sweaters, but that is for a different post.

    • Do a provisional cast on using a crocheted chain in a different color of yarn, and preferably something like cotton that will pull out easily, and a fairly loose chain (i.e. larger crochet hook).  Chain a few more stitches than 1/2 of the desired finished number.  For example, here I want to end up with 80 stitches, so I did a chain of 45+ sts.
    • Next pick up one stitch in end of the purl bumps on the reverse side of the chain.  I start a couple of stitches in from the end of the chain (hence the additional chain stitches).  Use a needle 2-3 sizes larger than what you will knit your socks with.  I used a size 4 needle here.  Pick up 1/2 the number of finished stitches desired + 1.  I wanted to end up with 80 sts for my socks, so I picked up 40 + 1 =41 sts.
    • Join in a circle (with the forever mentioned note:  be careful not to twist your stitches), and knit 3-4 rows.
    • Using the needle size that you will be knitting the socks with:  *Knit the first stitch.  For the second stitch, reach over the top of the knitting into the cast-on edge, and pick up the first “purl bump” of your sock yarn (not the chain stitch yarn), this is where using a clearly contrasting color such as I did really helps.  Put it onto the left hand needle and purl that stitch.**
    • Repeat from * to **, ending with a K1.  You will now have your desired number of stitches plus one extra on your finished needle size, the first and last stitches will be knit stitches.
    • Do 2-3 rows of 1×1 ribbing.  On the first row knit the first and last stitch together.  The stitch count will now match your pattern requirements.
    • Go back and unzip the crochet chain, and you will have a beautifully stretchy edge that looks like it rolls over on itself.
    I am using this technique to start the Janel Laidman Granada socks that I am making.  These are a high sock, and I wanted a good stretchy edge to help them stay up. And here is the bounty from yesterday’s canning session.
    I made Strawberry-Rhubarb jam (used to be my favorite ever), and Raspberry-Rhubarb jam (my new all-time favorite).  I did not want to use Pectin, but tried oranges and lemons instead.  It is not as firm as I would like, but oh so tasty.  Next is a multi-berry jam, and I think that I will use Pectin this time.
     
    • stormarela 5:12 pm on May 29, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the tubular cast on instructions. I have been wanting to try it, and now I can. 😉 …. and.. strawberry rhubarb is my favourite jam. raspberry rhubarb? I will have to try that sometime.

      Like

      • knitting1105 6:20 pm on May 29, 2011 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the feedback. Let me know if you have any issues with the tubular cast-on, and I will try to “talk you through it”. Definitely, Raspberry-Rhubarb jam rocks!

        Like

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